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Bethany Book Fair

I am happy to announce I will be at the Bethany Book Fair this year in Mankato, MN. Got some cool posters, cards, etc., to give out and books to sell, namely Trolls for Dust, Seasons One and Two. Season Three is still in the works. The fair is part of the Fall Festival there and is on October 2nd, from 10AM-3PM in the SFC Younge Gym. Also, I am trying out a free ebook giveaway on Amazon. Never done this before, so we’ll see how it goes. It is for Trolls for Dust, Season One, and goes from October 1-5, 2021.

Happy Reading, everyone!

Vindication is coming, is already here.

Have a busy day ahead of me, so not sure I’ll get around to any reviews, but want to encourage everyone to follow Project Veritas. Like them or hate them, they are doing work that the main stream journalists often aren’t. This forcing of the COV vaccine, any vaccine really, but this in particular is one of the biggest crimes of humanity and especially of government that is supposed to watch out for our well-being.

Every day, story after story, the reasonable stance not to take the vaccine is being vindicated over and over and over again. I thank God for all willing to stand up and tell the truth and for whistleblowers like this woman. Wish that I could be that brave. I am so sorry for all those that have been harmed by this and also for all the many living in constant fear. God bless and here’s the link. Not sure how long Youtube will keep it up: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obdI7tgKLtA

Autumn in Minnesota and updates

Autumn, Fall, Pumpkin Spice Season, whatever you want to call it, I love this time of year with the cooler weather perfect for leggings, jeans and sweatshirts. In Minnesota it always feels even more special, with all of the corn and beans ripening, the apples ready for picking, and the trees changing colors. Backyard grilling and fires over which to roast marshmallows. County and state fairs with delicacies galore. Favorite stop offs like the giant yellow candy store in Shakopee and pie at Emma Krumbee’s. New possibilities like zip lining at Kerfoot or exploring trails in Henderson. Hiking at the state parks and taking day trips with friends and family. Hunting for future Christmas gifts. Cooking fall dishes like butternut squash soup or spicy Indian food. Attending Trunk or Treats or Halloween/Fall parties. Drinking hot cider and hot cocoa. And especially, curling on the couch with a hot drink and a good book. Minnesota is awesome all around, but especially in the fall.

North Shore, Fall 2020
Tallest waterfall in MN – on border with Canada, Fall 2020

Some Updates: Only two more books, The Silver Chair and The Last Battle, until I finish The Chronicles of Narnia. So far The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is still my favorite.

I will be selling books at a book fair at Bethany Lutheran College in Mankato, MN, on October 2nd, so if you want copies of Trolls for Dust or an autograph, stop on by.

Loving The Possessed by Fyodor Dostoevsky so far and beginning another Brandon Sanderson one, Elantris. I am really trying to like and read Throne of Bones by Vox Day, but so far it is one long battle and that’s about it. Liked Summa Elvetica a lot better, but I will keep at it and hope once the story really picks up I will like it. Have another interesting fantasy series on my list: The Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolf. Sounds like it might be difficult to get through, too, but I met a big fan of the series who really talked it up, so at least have to try it. Also reading The Moon-Spinners by Mary Stewart. Saw the movie based on this with Hayley Mills awhile ago and it was a trippy adventure. The book is waylaid by a lot of scenery description. Am I the only one who finds most detailed scenery descriptions unnecessary in stories? Guess I’m more of a get the plot moving or characters moving kind of girl.

As far as Kdramas: I am rewatching the awesome The Lookout or The Guardians starring Kim Young Kwang (Pinocchio) and Lee Si Young (Playful Kiss). It’s got a stellar soundtrack and lots of action and intrigue. Started Witch‘s Court/Witch at Court with Jung Ryeo Won (The Lord of Dramas) and Yoon Hyun Min (Tunnel). Although I’m excited to see Yoon as a leading man here, it’s a heavy topic: Two prosecutors end up working in the Crimes against Girls unit. Jung’s character is thus far rather unsympathetic to her sex, but I think that will change over time. She plays a character you love to hate that will turn into one you’ll just love. At least, I hope so. Both leads have good chemistry so far and the acting is good. They seem like real people. Maybe not regular, but real people.

Ignorance is Death: Plague of Corruption Book Review

Oftentimes we think of corruption as a minor ailment in our society. The saying is that power corrupts, right? Anyone in a position of power is likely to be a bit corrupt, that is, a bit selfish and looking out only for themselves and their own interests, and their own agendas. And while it is true that in a sinful world we can never stamp out corruption completely, we should still be smart enough to understand that it shouldn’t be tolerated. Corruption isn’t just a rot slowly eating away at something, no, it is the complete distortion of something. A corrupt government, for example, is not a government, but a different entity entirely. A government governs, a corrupt government destroys a country.

Plague of Corruption by Dr. Judy Mikovits and Kent Heckenlively deals specifically with corruption in healthcare and science. This corruption is horrifying, but really not surprising considering that almost every level of our society is now corrupt. Almost every institution in America, and other countries as well, is doing the complete opposite of what they were created for. Selfishness doesn’t adequately describe it, and it’s certainly not a minor ailment. What this book describes is abominable on so many levels. Health care is so far from being about health that the question arises: What exactly is the purpose of the health care industry now today? Science, too. Whatever “science” is that people love so *&^% much, it’s not the observation of the real world and how it works. And it’s certainly not about asking questions.

This book was a good read, but the latter half is much better than the first. The authors take their time and use a roundabout way to get us to the destination. I enjoyed the second half largely because I was familiar with much of the information already and was intrigued to see it all fit together with the information from the start of the book. Mikovits begins with a harrowing tale that could easily be a crime show segment or something from a John Grisham novel. Those already skeptical of what’s coming would at this point perhaps roll their eyes and put down the book. But if they did that they would be missing a great deal. Not missing so much the information this book gives, but the questions it raises. Questions we should all be asking now and questions we or our great-greats should have been asking from the beginning. Ignorance is not bliss, as the saying goes. Ignorance is death.

My brother-in-law is fond of saying that babies are stupid. From one perspective, yes, they are; from another, babies are simply ignorant, and that is why for the first few years of life a parent’s number one job is to keep their child alive. Parents have to teach their kids about all the ways they could die and how to avoid them. Babies will really stick their fingers in an outlet, because why not? Babies are so cute and innocent, and as adults we can aspire to be like that because it’s good, but we should never aspire to ignorance. As this book shows. Ignorance equals death, if not for ourselves, perhaps for future generations.

As you can already tell this is going to be a lengthy review. I have a lot of thoughts about the material and there’s just so much to unpack in the book and about Mikovits’s story. She is a scientist that began work in 1980s largely dealing with retroviruses, cancer, and the like. She and her colleague, Dr. Frank Ruscetti, who was a founder of the retrovirus field, and isolated XMRV, or Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus, and its connection to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Yes that Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. The most famous retrovirus is HIV and the book has much to say about that, too, and the corrupt Dr. Fauci.

As the book unfolds, it describes corruption in science, corruption in the law, corruption in government, corruption in testimony for the government’s vaccine court, which few know exists, but the heart of the matter is the physical manifestation of all of this corruption: Vaccines. Vaccines don’t equal dollar signs so much as they equal power, and absolute power at that. This book was written just before COVID hit and it’s obvious how all of the corruption and problems Mikovits describes are directly correlated to the medical tyranny we see today, right down to that dapper little Fauci.

So what’s wrong with vaccines, exactly? That’s the wrong question. Maybe the question should really be, what’s right about them? Mikovits takes one component: animal cell lines used in the manufacturing of vaccines and other medical research, and explains in detail the harm just that one thing in a jab is doing to the human body. Or could be doing to the human body. The staggering thing is, we really don’t know the affects and/or damage. Mikovits would encourage further study. Who knows, maybe further study would reveal more about what’s right in vaccines?

In her career, Mikovits came across quite a few instances where it was clear that these retroviruses were from animals and had been passed onto humans somehow. Each time she questioned a medical source, whether growth hormones given to cows, or vaccines given to people, she ran into trouble. Questioning these things is not allowed. Basically our corrupt institutions know quite well that these things are damaging people. They know exactly what they are doing and either they simply don’t want to get caught or they just don’t care. The animal cell lines used in manufacturing vaccines are directly related to HIV, XMRV, and other retroviruses and they are being passed to us, into our bodies are doing damage, causing AIDS, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and who knows what else.

“We are mixing animal and human tissue in laboratory cultures, then injecting them into human beings in a way that bypasses their traditional defenses, such as stomach acid breaking down pathogens.” – p. 124

Not only that, but we are injecting several pathogens at once with complete ignorance of what that combo does to the human body. In addition, we have no idea what injecting multiple pathogens along with animal cells, human cells, and the host of other poisons and chemicals also in vaccines actually does to the human body. How is this at all considered either safe or good for one’s health? I say ignorance, because it’s true. No one wants to know, not so many of the patients, or the doctors, or the health officials, or the scientists. When a person has a health problem after getting a vaccine, the vaccine being even a possible cause is across the universe in most people’s minds. When the CDC does a study on autism and vaccines and finds there is a connection that they should study further, they instead destroy the evidence. For some strange reason vaccines are considered a holy thing. A perfect creation made by humanity, far superior to the immune system that God gave us. Far superior to any medicinal plant God created. Sometime it’s like something beyond ignorance or even brainwashing of the general public. It’s a spell. If there ever really was an actual spell on people, this, to me, is it, this unquestioning acceptance of all things vaccine.

It’s only now, with COVID that more and more people are actually starting to question vaccines. And evil is showing its stupidity in forcing the vaccine, causing even more to question not only its effectiveness, but especially its safety. The stories Mikovits shares of people suffering, really suffering from vaccines and the disease and autoimmune disorders they have brought, are heartbreaking, as is the callousness of the powers that be. There are plenty of doctors and scientists who are not corrupt, who do want to, and can actually help. It’s just that they all have been and are now so often silenced from the public discourse.

Mikovits mentions her faith in God a few times in the book, but the fact that she ends in hope speaks volumes as well. She has hope that all this immune dysfunction people have now from vaccines can be remedied. Among the remedies, she mentions diets like keto and also practicing fasting. I cheered at that. So many people are finding better health by doing and especially eating the opposite of what their doctors tell them. Is it possible for corruption to simply fail when no one’s buying into it any longer? I hope so, I really do. People are waking up to the truth, and it has been a very slow process, but the tyrannical overreach has hastened things along considerably. That’s a strange thing to be grateful for, but I am.

No matter what side you’re on when it comes to health and science, I think Dr. Mikovits’s story is important and this book worth reading. We should be able to agree that both health and science need major cleanups for the good of future generations. We should be able to agree that people asking questions should not be silenced, but listened to. We should be able to agree that in matters of especially health, people need good information to make their decisions, and also that it is their decision. We should agree that those in power in both health and science need to be held to account. Again, ignorance is not bliss, it’s death, the death of our health, the death of our society, the death of even the knowledge that we’ve collected. If science cannot be questioned, then it is no longer science, but a cult or religion. Even God himself allows questions, invites them, even.

Not sure how many times I used the word “corrupt” in this review, but, whew, it was a lot. Plague of Corruption showcases how corruption is a plague on almost every aspect and institution supposed to keep us safe. This, I knew, and this we all know on some level, but Mikovits’s story really brings it home with all the connections from her research from the 1980s until now. A good read and thought provoking, giving many aspects to go and research for oneself, if one so chooses, and hopefully many have and do.

Until next time! –Pixie

50% Got What?

So many things I can’t wrap my head around these days. Not sure how to get ahold of a Pfizer vaccine insert, but if this lady reading through it is correct, wow. I hope, I really, really hope she’s correct that only 50% of the people got the actual vaccine and 50% got a placebo. Thank God, because it means my friends and family who’ve already taken the vaccine have a chance! Although the virus may be a mythical creature–thank you, Alberta!–the vaccine certainly is not, otherwise the world governments and corporations wouldn’t be so hellbent on forcing us all to take them. Now the story a few months ago of people all getting saline solution instead of vaccine makes sense. Now it makes sense that Pfizer got rid of their initial control group–they had been promised a much bigger one, the general public. But this makes me hopeful that at least the physical harm of this experiment will be limited. Sadly, the true harm of all of this is psychological and spiritual, and so far it’s had no limits. If you are a Christian, I encourage you to pray like you’ve never prayed before. The regular people of the world are all facing an assault the likes of which perhaps the world has never been seen before. All our great technology is being arranged to enslave us. Pray for all peoples, but especially for those in Australia, who are having a very hard time, and pray that Americans truly wake up and stand up. If America falls, there’s isn’t anywhere else to go for freedom. This tyranny isn’t going to stop unless we stop it, unless we say no. With jobs and income on the line, it’s a very hard thing to do, but it still is going to be easier to do now rather than later.

Thank God, also, that these evil people are planning on boosters, boosters, and more boosters. They just can’t help but overplay their hand. It’s funny that just as people were becoming wise to the futility and perhaps even harm of the flu shot that this mythological creature comes along, huh? And, what do you know, same symptoms as the flu? So, so interesting. The truth will out, I know it will and the greedy tyrants will be their own undoing. May God foil all of their plans and use them instead for His plans and our eternal good. These are trouble filled days, but exciting ones, too.

Let me share again something with you I wrote a few years ago. This is no longer fiction. I wrote this 9/29/2010.

A Society of Health

“Aaachoooiee!!”  Alyssa Taylor sneezed mightily into a tissue from the box on her desk.

“Bless you.”  Raymond Bins, her coworker said as he tapped away on a computer spreadsheet.  “Coming down with something?”

“I think it’s allergies.  Ever since we moved here––”

“Who sneezed?”  Ariana Blight stepped ferociously around the office partition.  She looked a bit like a crow with her tiny, birdlike frame, black sweater and pants.  Her dull gray hair was pulled tightly back into a bun that rested heavily on top of her little, wobbling head.  

Alyssa raised her hand.  “Guilty,”  She smiled sheepishly.  “Sorry, I know my sneezes are so loud.  My daughter always says I sound like a firecracker.”  She drew back into her chair as the older woman stepped up to her, the woman’s beady eyes bright with anticipation.  

“Do you have a cold?”

“It’s…just allergies.”  Alyssa exchanged a glance with Raymond who had stopped typing.  “This building is so full of dust…”  Ariana continued to inspect her, bending low enough to look up her nostrils.  “Is everything all right, Ariana?”

“You have mucus,”  She pointed to the left nostril.  “There.  It appears yellow, not clear.  Blow into this.”  The small woman brought forth a crisp handkerchief from the bowels of her sweater.  Laughing a little, Alyssa obliged.  Raymond rolled his eyes and made crazy signs that the old woman couldn’t see.  It had never been clear to them what exactly Ariana’s job at the company was, but she always seemed to know everything about everyone.  Ariana fearlessly opened the handkerchief and proceeded to inspect the leavings.  “As I thought. Yellow, going on green.  You, Ms. Alyssa Taylor, have the beginnings of a very bad cold, an infection.”

Alyssa shrugged.  “You know, I did feel a bit off yesterday, but I thought it was the weather.  And my allergies get so bad this time of year…”  She trailed off when she saw the glinting triumph in the older woman’s eyes.  “Is there a problem?”

Ariana Blight pulled a small flip-top notebook out of a sweater pocket.  She proceeded to read:  “United States Code, Title Forty-Two, Chapter Two, Section Eight Thousand Four Hundred and Nineteen:  All persons shall take precautions to prevent the spreading of the common cold.  Subsection D, Four:  Any person expectorating or sneezing in a public place shall be examined for infection.  If infection is found, said persons are duty-bound to report to the nearest Health Center and receive treatment.  Upon refusal to do so within one hour of infection report, said person may be subjected to a fine of One Hundred Dollars or up to Thirty days in the local quarantine cell.  Subsection D, Twenty:  Any and all persons failing to comply with this Chapter shall be labeled as a Spreader of Disease and a criminal under this Title Forty-Two.”  

“What?”  Alyssa blinked up at her.  “I don’t…I’ve never heard…”

“They didn’t publish it, you see,”  Ariana whispered softly, leaning over her.  “Only passed it, our wonderful…New Congress.  Now, let’s come along down to the office Health Center, shall we?”  Alyssa sat there blankly.  “Ah, and Raymond…”  The crow-like woman filled out a yellow slip from her pad of paper, ripped it off, and handed it to him.  “The citation number, should you wish to pursue legal action in the near future.  Being around her nine hours out of the day, you are the likeliest to suffer from her…negligence.”  Raymond took the paper and paled at its contents.  “Of course, should you also come down with said infection and fail to address it immediately, you will be issued a citation as well.”

Awaken: Sci-Fi Awesomeness (spoilers)

This was one of the most well-written shows I’ve ever watched. Awaken by Shin Yoo Dam, is a mystery revolving around events that happened 20-some years ago at an orphanage called White Night Village. If you haven’t yet seen this show, I would recommend watching it while knowing little about the plot or characters, much better that way. I was confused at what was going on the first few episodes, but it kept me watching, so props to writer Shin.

The first episode gives a little teaser into what happened at White Night Village, but then we are soon introduced to our police investigation team led by Do Jung Woo, played by Namkoong Min (The Undateables). Haven’t seen Min in a lot, but he’s a cutie, and he’s my age, so yay for 1978! He is so totally awesome in this role and I can’t see anyone else playing Do. An FBI agent from the US enters the scene as she’s been called to help with the strange serial killer case they working, a case in which people appear to kill themselves for no reason–A Study in Scarlet, anyone? Jamie Leighton is no Sherlock, but she’s dogged in her work and gets along well with the team. And her backpack is almost its own character. Jamie is played by the beautiful Lee Chung Ah, and I know her best from that crazy movie The Temptation of Wolves.

Also on the investigation team is Kang Hye Won, played by Seon Hyun (Orange Marmalade), and although she’s an awesome fighter, she had way too many anger management issues at first, so that it took me a bit to warm up to her. The team tech guy is Yoon Seok Pil (Choi Dae Chul, Vagabond) and the new recruit is Jang Ji Wan (Lee Sin Young, Crash Landing on You).

Throughout their investigation, the team gets drawn into a deep, dark web, I’m sorry of which to say probably has some basis in reality. We all know of child trafficking in the world, and we all know that key rich people are the ones doing it and that awful things are done to the children. We all know scientists exist who care only for their experiments and little for humanity. Awaken puts both things together. The bad guys are truly villains, even the ones we don’t get to see much of, and it is their lack of remorse that is truly chilling. Aside from Min, the other standout actors were Yoon Sun Woo as an abused young man and later a villain, and An Si Ha who’s beauty makes her character all the more frightening.

Some watchers will probably get frustrated that little is explained in much of the first half of the show, but as the explanations unfold, their clockwork intricacies turn the story into a true morality tale. And the ending was poignant and spot on. Truly great characterizations and great writing. Can’t say much for the soundtrack as I barely noticed it, and if you’re looking for romance, keep looking. Love is there, though, and that’s more important.

As for the big spoilers, ah, I don’t really want to give them now. It’s so, so much better if you don’t know what’s coming. Kinda like life, really. However, I will never think of lollipops in quite the same way. Awaken is both a great police procedural and an old school sci-fi story. In some respects it’s a slow burn, but the payoff is satisfying. Did I mention the writing was great? Looking forward to what writer Shin does in the future. This would also make a great book.

Updates

On vacation the rest of this week, so won’t be posting any reviews until next week. Almost done watching the Kdrama Awaken, which is fantastic, so look for that review coming. I’ve started Dostoevsky’s The Possessed, loving it, of course, but it’s very long, so I am not sure when I’ll finish it. Planning how to resist buying more used books on my trip, but it seems like a futile task, because I will surely find something I just have to get. Slowly figuring out what a TwiP is, so look for that, too, in the near future. TfD3 is coming along, coming along, just rather a hobble right now. Despite all the craziness going on in the world, I am happy and confident in Christ and salvation. God is ultimately in control and always wins. Gab is an exciting place to be these days. God be with you ’til we “meet” again. 🙂

Touch Your Heart: A True RomCom

Why it took me so long to watch Touch Your Heart, which came out in 2019 is this: One, it looked boring. Two, I wasn’t confident in the acting skills of either of the leads. Despite how good they were in Goblin, in much of their previous works I found both Lee Dong Wook and Yoo In Na rather boring and without good screen presence. However, as they’ve aged, they have improved much, and Goblin showcased that. Lee was especially good as the lead in Tale of the Nine-Tailed, so I thought I’d give him another chance.

Coming close on the heels of the successful romance fantasy Goblin aka Guardian: The Lonely and Great God, Touch Your Heart snapped up the second lead couple in that drama to star in this one. I don’t know how Lee and Yoo relate to each other in real life, but on screen they are gold. And gold is gold. Both could have continued success simply starring together in romances from here on out. Chemistry like that cannot be bought or manufactured. They are actors that bring out the best in each other. They also seem to not age, which is a plus in their industry.

Despite how many romantic comedies exist, it’s rare to actually find a movie or show that is fully romantic and comedic. Touch Your Heart was both, but I was very glad for the comedy because the romance was almost too perfect and promotes unrealistic expectations–no one is that caring for the other person, right? Based off a web novel, the story follows a down-and-out actress Oh Yoon Seo (Yoo), who dearly needs a break. When reluctantly offered the lead in a courtroom romcom, Yoon Seo eagerly accepts, promising to work at a law firm for a few months as research for her role. Fortunately her agency boss is BFFs with a CEO of the law firm Always, and the CEO is an embarrassingly big fan of hers. Yoon Seo is assigned to apprentice as secretary with lawyer Kwon Jung Rok (Lee) and immediately her bright and bubbly personality clashes with Jung Rok’s prickly introvert style.

As the main characters begin to fall for each other, the minor characters come out to play, and they are hilarious! They seamlessly replace the comedy of the leads as the leads take over the romance part. The biggest standout is Oh Jung Se (It’s Okay to Not Be Okay) as the CEO, who has great and sarcastic deadpan humor. The second lead couple are also amazing, and as in Goblin, they nearly upstage the main couple. Lawyer Choi and Lawyer Dan could easily headline their own show. Choi, played by the almost too good-looking Shim Hyung Tak (Melting Me Softly), and Dan, played by Park Kyung Hae (Goblin), seem an unlikely fit at first, but by the end they’ve convinced us (and themselves) they have something together that they couldn’t have with anyone else. Shim really needs to star in his own show, already. He’s stuck on comedy, but clearly has the presence and skills to do much more. He is definitely my latest Kdrama crush.

Props to whoever chose the opening song in the first episode, which became an instant addiction for me: “Strike Up the Band” by The Kinnardlys. It’s peppy and talks about living well and sincerely, a good fit for the story we are about to watch. Both leads live life to the fullest no matter what they are doing and have solid hearts and characters. Props also to the sound effects people! They had to do a lot of work in this one, but every weird sound makes it all more hilarious. They did a great job.

If you’re looking for a satisfying and heartfelt RomCom, check out Touch Your Heart. It won’t disappoint, the lead actors are gold together, it delivers unexpected thrills, and it is satisfying both romantically and comedically.

Dr. Mütter’s Marvels: Book Review

After reading a mystery story about a cabinet of curiosities, Dr. Mütter’s Marvels, A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine, was a good next nonfiction read. This book is by Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz, and not only is it a fascinating tale, but the book is very artistically designed.

Thomas Dent Mütter was a famous surgeon in Philadelphia, 1811-1859, at a time when surgery and medicine were a free-for-all. One didn’t have to have a medical license to practice, and surgery itself was positively barbaric compared to today. Mutter, who later added the umlaut affectation to his name, was quite a character, brilliant to his students, compassionate to his patients, and a true innovator, especially in the field of plastic surgery. He often worked on the poor unfortunates whose defects and deformities no one else would touch. O’Keefe Aptowicz visited his famous museum in Philadelphia as a child and became so fascinated by him that she ended up researching his life and writing this story.

What an amazing story it was too read! All the infighting between doctors and surgeons and all out in public, the dramatic and bombastic medical lectures, the competition between the University of Philadelphia (America’s first medical school) and Jefferson Medical College, the weirdness of Mütter, who often wore silk suits to surgery, and his colleagues like Charles D. Meigs, the differences in experience from Paris to Philadelphia, the amazing surgeries and cases–this story would make an awesome TV show. Meigs could even be the villain in the piece, but he’s more to be pitied than anything else. Sometimes time passes people by, sometimes people don’t change with the times when really they should.

Doctors and surgeons are not gods; neither is the medical industry infallible. In the early 1800s, perhaps the mistakes made in medicine can be excused somewhat, as everything was just getting started with regulating and licensing and all that, but in many ways doctors and medicine have not changed. Even today there are big controversies and differences of opinions in the field, and as it was then, the doctors that don’t fit the industry narrative are silenced as much as possible. It’s sad that more aren’t willing to let all opinions be heard, but that’s they way it so often is with many things. That Mütter made any change is remarkable, and it seems to me he was blessed by God in this, but also that God had him born at the right time, a time when people were willing to change and to consider change. Near the end of his life, America went through a Civil War over slavery, that’s how much things were changing. Today, it’s tempting to think we’ve figured things out medically, but it wasn’t so long ago that most did not know or did not believe that infection and disease could be transmitted by not washing ones hands. Meigs was one such surgeon and refused to change. How many died by his hand when they didn’t need to? It’s a sobering thought. How many die today at the hands of medical professionals who refuse to looks at standards of care that are doing just the opposite for their patients? Fortunately, there are always some, like Mütter, who are true forward thinkers, people with genuine smarts and common sense.

The most striking aspect to me about Mütter was his compassion for the patients–the time he took to get them used to what would happen in the surgery in a time when the only anesthesia was wine, the quickness with which he performed his cutting and stitching, and his brilliant idea of installing aftercare. He really brought the “care” into medical care. It’s mind boggling now to think that patients were given wine and held down for a surgery or amputation and forced to go through with he surgery no matter what, then dumped into a bumpy carriage to recover at home, all performed in front of hundreds of medical students. Compassionate care is more or less standard in America today, though we still have a long ways to go, too. So, so many people are sick today, especially with things like cancer and chronic illness, that it’s too easy to start treating patients like numbers. That’s what I see with vaccines and COVID, the patients are numbers and everyone wants a part of the staggering amounts of money being thrown in at both things. There are doctors who very clearly disagree with the narrative, who have tried explaining that COVID is fairly easy to treat, that it’s not the worst thing since the Black Plague, and that for most a vaccine isn’t even necessary. A step beyond that, there thankfully are many medical professionals also decrying the hasty use of the COVID experimental vaccines, calling attention to the concerning reactions and side effects. As in Mütter’s day, they are purposefully being drowned out, but not for long, I think, for the truth does will out.

Take anesthesia, a new innovation in Mütter’s time, and something that actually bypassed the need for his brand of surgery preparation, which was to meet for weeks with he patient touching and massaging the area to be cut open, so that they wouldn’t be afraid when the surgery finally happened. Instead of being angry about it, however, Mütter embraced the technology, knowing that if it was better for the patient, it would be better for the surgeons too. He also stressed that for the doctor and surgeon, a surgery should be a last and best step–most all other avenues should be tried first. This is a big way we fail today. Surgeries are recommended today so often as to make them routine. Perhaps this should not be. Perhaps there are other ways and better ways to heal. I think of the experience people have had changing their diet, going on keto or carnivore. Much of their inflammation and distress disappears. The truth is getting out there, little by little, especially as people perhaps now have less money to spend on expensive surgeries, but it’s still only a precious few doctors that really embrace these cheaper means.

This story is a great read and of course whatever one’s experience in the medical field, different aspects will resonate more keenly. What I got out of it, would not be what you get out of it. What a fun trip it would be to go to Philadelphia someday and see Mütter’s museum and all of the curiosities collected there. It is amazing that even today we really don’t know sometimes what causes odd growths and deformities on a person. God’s creation is complex and we have a long way to go.

Half-Book Review: Unwind

Being a fan of Neal Schusterman’s Arc of a Scythe series, the third book of which I have yet to read, I wanted to try another of his series. Schusterman likes weighty moral topics and is a great writer for young adults. Not many authors are truly able to write YA. It’s a delicate balance between being too childish and too adult. He succeeds by simply treating his characters as people, and giving them introspection without navel gazing. Although teens and toddlers are the ages of humans in which we are most likely to act the most immature and the most selfish, these are stages of life, not a place where any human stays. Toddlers grow out of their tantrums and teens eventually get a handle on their hormones and emotions. Basically, I like that Schusterman doesn’t dwell so much on the kids being teens as he does on the societies in which they find themselves.

I really loved Unwind, but only got halfway through. Right now the topic is just too heavy for me. Unwind is set in an alternate America where there was a Heartland War with the pro-life people fighting the prochoice people. Yes, as in for or against abortion. Really don’t know why the abortionists get a pass with “prochoice.” The stance is really pro-death, not really about having more choices. Certainly not more choices for the babies in question. Anyway, in this war, the pro-life side basically ended up losing. A compromise was made that is a mockery of honoring life. Abortion is now illegal–unwed mothers and/or fathers, and or married/unmarried couples who conceive a child are required to complete the pregnancy and bring the baby into the world, caring for it as they should. However, once a child reaches the teenage years, their life is suddenly forfeit. The parents or guardians can sign away their lives, marking them to be “unwound,” or all of their body parts used in transplants to other younger or older people who need them.

This plot immediately brought to mind Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, as it deals with a similar world and plot: Clones are raised to be come organ and limb donors and everyone pretends this is okay. As the teens in Unwind are not clones, and still live and interact with supposedly loving parents who decide to unwind them, Schusterman’s world strains credulity a bit more than Ishiguro’s does. However, when considering the topic of abortion and the atrocities done to those babies, not only murdering them, but murdering them for body parts and research to improve the lives of older people not denied life, Schusterman’s world could be possible if the love of most for human life continues to grow colder and colder.

The most terrifying thing about reading this book was how normal everything was, how legal, how every i of the law was dotted, how every t was crossed. But of course that’s how it works with psychos who want to take life. Psychopaths will say they talked too loud or something, psychopath abortionists will say the babies are unwanted, or won’t live full lives. Same with euthanasia advocates. And then once the abomination is sufficiently normalized, the dotting and crossing doesn’t matter so much, and Schusterman gives us evidence of that in this world, too, as pretty much any teen can be unwound for most any reason, and one can guess that things didn’t start out that way. Even religion is in on the scam, pretending some teens to be unwound are “tithes” or “offerings,” presumably to the God Creator, but it never actually said, though the religion seems nominally Christian. Could be a revival of any number of ancient religions that practiced child sacrifice. Nothing new under the sun.

The biggest legal framework still in place with this open season on human life is the age definition. You can only kill teens, not before age 13, and not after 18. And in this way the society can pretend it still values life. And, I’m getting so worked up already, which I why I just couldn’t take anymore of this story for now.

It’s a difficult topic. There are unwanted children. There just are, and what to do with them is tricky. Do other people, not their biological parents have a responsibility towards them? Does society? Unwind takes this question a step further, do legal parents have a responsibility to raise teens to full adulthood? Does society have responsibility towards unwanted teens? They get away with all this in justifying their actions due to the teens’ behavior. Many of the teens marked to be unwound are juvenile delinquents or belligerent in some way. (One would think uncooperative teenagers were a new invention). Eugenics is put into practice by trying to weed out undesirable behaviors from society, but then there’s a requirement that all body parts of the unwinds must be transplanted and/or used on a living human being. It’s just bizarre and totally fitting, for once regard for human life is thrown out the window, everything is permissible, including illogical double think. And most likely the teens are going to find that nobody’s really following the rules. That’s it’s a free-for-all.

This book hit closer to home than the Arc of a Scythe series. Scythe, for right now, seems something truly of fantasy, but Unwind…oh, boy, it’s possible. Heartbreakingly possible. There’s a great part in the book where some of these kids marked to be unwound discuss when they think life begins. Like many, they conclude they just don’t know, but people conveniently pretend not to know things when they don’t want to deal with reality. Life begins at conception. Before conception, there is no life. It’s really not that hard, but in this society, and in ours, too, we’ve fallen so far away from actual science and truth, that it’s easy to think we really just don’t know the answer to some things. But, if we truly don’t know the answer, why not err on the side of caution? Why not err on the side of life, not death? In this society they have in part, they’ve made abortion illegal, but in wanting to stop a war, they’ve made an even bigger error by allowing the mass murder of those in a certain age group. If they were smarter, they would have picked an age group that’s not so volatile. But of course, it’s really about the body part harvesting, and for that to work the best, the young must be used.

It is my opinion that those on the side of life should not compromise with those on the side of death. Pro-death is evil. We shouldn’t compromise with evil. Even to stop a war. War is preferable to a society like this. War is often necessary to fight evil, and it’s something we forget. Time and time again I see those who are supposedly on the side of good compromise with those on the side of evil. I’m sure I’ve done it myself–go along to get along. It is a truly cowardly sin. And society moves more and more away from God instead of towards him.

Someday I hope to come back to this series and see how it plays out. Really like the life topics that Schusterman focuses on in his stuff. It makes one thing, really think about the logic and emotions behind life and death issues and human rights. Do the characters become solidly pro-life, wanting life for all, a chance for all human beings? Some probably do and some do not. Was this truly the only way to stop the Heartland War? Likely not. Likely as it is today, the society is being lied to about what actually happened and how it happened. But, the truth will out.

One additional thing: The religious tithe kid had a party, kind of like a Bar Mitzvah, and this is an idea I had too, for my vaccine story that I was working on awhile ago. In my story those kids, too, were excited to get a one-time vaccine that promised to prevent all sickness in their lives. As reality became stranger than my fiction, I simply stopped writing the story. It’s jaw dropping to me all that has happened in recent years, the trampling of life and liberty, the outright lies from everyone, the continuing silencing of the truth, the rush to coerce people into vaccinating–even against their will–and refusing to look properly at all of the negative consequences of the experiment–and it is still an experiment, not something properly approved. The quickness to forget simple truths, like sunlight and fresh air being the best medicine for respiratory diseases. Every day, I feel like shouting the mantra I created in my story to all the vaccine zealots: The Science is Safe, the Science is Sound, the Science is Settled. Say it enough times and it’s all true, right?

Okay, okay, stepping off the soapbox again. Kudos to the writer, but I just couldn’t finish the story at this time.